Friday, September 28, 2007

How to deal with Indian tech support.....


Royal Enfield Bullet 500 - Military
Originally uploaded by Jason Means

Since I have some National Guard educational dollars to play with, I started taking some online classes this Fall, and recently got my new laptop. As I was hooking it up late last night, I quickly discovered that it wouldn't configure the current modem I'm using, so a call to tech support was needed.

After about a ten minute wait, a very exotic voice greeted me on the other end of the line. She continued to say her name was Mitali and that she would be helping me out with my technical issue. From the tone of her voice, I could easily tell that she wasn't local, and she'd had her daily fill of dealing with incompetent Americans trying to access porn and online poker.

As the conversation proceeded, there was the customary questions regarding weather and such as my modem was pinged from half way around the world. I responded in jovial fashion and regaled her with how lovely Fall was here in West Virginia. I in turn asked her how the weather was where she was at, to which she said "just fine." Promptly, I interjected and asked where she was located. Hesitantly.... and very quietly, she whimpered out.... India. I'm sure that dealing with typical American hillbillies this is always a point of contention, but not so with yours truly.

I immediately said "that's terrific, I work for a motorcycle shop that sells bikes that are built in India." Mitali of course was confused at this point, so I proceeded to tell her in more detail that I worked at ScooterBob's and we absolutely loved Royal Enfields, and that they're the greatest bikes on the planet.

For those of you who are not familiar with Royal Enfield, they're a true British survivor that's been made in India since the early 50's. For as much as an American loves Harley Davidson (a foaming rant in the making), Indians love their RE's even more.

After I said that I sold Royal Enfields, Mitali said "Oh my goodness, we do love our thumpers." (RE's are often referred to as thumpers due to their large single cylinder that thumps down the road in very rhythmic fashion) Unfortunately, Mitali knew that she was getting off topic and that she would more than likely be caned or something if she delved too much into a personal conversation with me. So, it was back to the task at hand. However, she had a renewed sense of energy in her voice and did everything over the next ten minutes or so shy of waxing my keyboard. She was impressed at my knowledge of an Indian icon and was kind in return.

I guess if this rambling blog does have a moral, it's that if you're ever on the phone with Indian tech support, just tell'em how nice you think Royal Enfields are. Not only will they be pleased with your knowledge, but recognizing their national bike will put a smile on their face and yours.

Chariots are for sissies - real Gods ride an Enfield.

Wednesday, September 26, 2007

Orange Lily - Macro


Orange Lily
Originally uploaded by Jason Means

I was going through some of my image sets this evening and came across this macro of an orange lily. I'm always stunned every time I see this image. Such a simple shot with minimal depth of field and minor color correction in Photoshop.

To snag such an image literally five feet away from my front door makes me wonder why I can't take even better shots when I'm further away from home and really concentrating on the job at hand.

www.flickr.com/photos/jasonscottmeans

Panzer Grey CJ750 - B&W Sepia Tone


Self Portrait on Panzer Grey CJ750 - B&W Sepia Tone
Originally uploaded by Jason Means

The photojournalism article that I wrote for The Utatan (http://www.utata.org/) has been getting some really good exposure and comments. I'm really happy that my contribution may shed just a little more light on a really great bike.

http://www.utata.org/project/uppj/item/677667163/

Tuesday, September 25, 2007

Praying Mantis


Praying Mantis
Originally uploaded by Jason Means

To say the least, I was quite stunned when my wife and daughter brought home this Praying Mantis. They found in on the way home from school, and naturally, it's been a point of interest ever since.

What was even more amazing was how hungry this guy was. He absolutely devoured a piece of raw hamburger chunks at a time. I can see now why they are such an important part of our environment since they'll eat anything you put in front of them.

Check out some more pics at www.flickr.com/photos/jasonscottmeans